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DCVMN and the Future Vaccine Manufacturing Hub launched a novel partnership for responsible innovation in emerging countries

London 17 January 2018 - A new research hub has been set up in the UK to improve vaccine coverage in developing countries and improve the response to life-threatening outbreaks like Ebola and Zika through the rapid deployment of vaccines.

This new effort, called the Future Vaccine Manufacturing Hub, led by Imperial College London and including other world-leading institutions, with a £10million funding by the UK’s Department for Health, will be collaborating with the Developing Countries Vaccine Manufacturers’ Network (DCVMN) on manufacturing projects initially in Bangladesh, China, India, Uganda and Vietnam, with expansion into other countries. The hub will build on new developments in life sciences, immunology and process systems to address challenges.

New approaches to be explored include the rapid production of yeast and bacterially-expressed particles that mimic components of infectious agents; development of synthetic RNA vaccines; manufacturing design and protein stabilization to preserve vaccines at high temperatures, avoiding the need for cold-chain.

There are currently 19.5 million infants that do not have access to basic vaccines and the deaths of one-third of children under five could be prevented with vaccinations. Lead investigator on the project, Professor Robin Shattock, said: “Many of these deaths, whether they are a result of polio, diphtheria measles or other infections, could be prevented through immunization, and the research hub will look to overcome hurdles in this field. We will also help to empower countries most at risk of infections to meet their local vaccine needs.”

“We are privileged to join the Hub’s research and educational efforts, collaborating with the Imperial College London, to advance the incorporation of new vaccine manufacturing technologies in emerging countries to benefit its people” said Dr. Sonia Pagliusi, Executive Secretary of DCVMN International.

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